Tag Archives forFlorist

How To Become A Florist

 

Do you love floral design? Do you see yourself working in an industry that makes people smile, serving customers and creating splendid floral creations? Perhaps the floristry industry is for you!

To become a florist you do need more than just a casual interest; you will need a mix of floral industry experience, floristry training and the right attitude. The right attitude is not only desired it’s essential.

Florists view their work  as a vocation, it comes from a deep centred love of the craft, the materials and the industry. While having formal post-secondary training is advantageous it is not typically necessary but it can certainly help develop the necessary skills, competencies and knowledge.

If you want to become a florist you may first want to ask yourself WHY you want to become one, to get to a deeper reason. Like any future career path it will involve a commitment of time, energy and finances. So before you do so you’ll want to make sure it’s a good fit for skills, current interests and personality traits.

If you want to learn more about your personality traits here is a free personal trait quiz (it’s scarily accurate!).

Overall can you say YES to these questions?

  • Do you enjoy learning about design?
  • Do you have a keen interest in floral design?
  • Can you work nimbley and skilfully with hands on crafting?
  • Do you have an interest in career field that offers the possibility of self-employment?
  • Are you are willing to learn all aspects of the floral industry

If you answered YES to most of the questions and you’re interested in a career as a florist but don’t know where to start, this florist career guide will teach you just about everything you need to get started.

Floristry as a Career

I can tell you that becoming and being a florist can be an exciting and challenging career. Like any other industry, it welcomes all ages and backgrounds and consists of people primarily passionate about being around flowers and willing to explore all aspects of the profession.

Besides being able to make a beautiful arrangement, you must be a reasonably quick worker, be sociable and have a pleasant and helpful manner because you’re constantly dealing with the public.

As we know, flowers touch people’s emotions. For example, customers who order funeral tributes are the relatives or friends of the deceased and since they’re emotionally vulnerable, as a florist, you will need to be sympathetic and understanding.

But we also have the privilege of sharing people’s most intimate moments of joy, such as when a bride-to-be selects her bouquet for the most important day of her life or when a proud father comes in to order an arrangement for his wife to celebrate their newest addition.

However, floristry is not all glamorous. There is a lot of hard work and long hours involved and our duties of maintaining a flower shop includes:

  • Unpacking stock as it comes in
  • Conditioning flowers and watering plants
  • Pricing merchandise and displaying it attractively
  • Attending to customers
  • Answering the phone
  • Completing orders and creating designs
  • Ensuring the shop is constantly tidy & presentable
  • Keeping book work up to date

And the list continues…

Working in a Florist Shop

Because of how busy it gets, you will need to be able to work efficiently. A typical day could include creating ten wreaths, several arrangements and posies. Sometimes these will need to be created, along with other customer’s demands while they wait.

Basic run-down of a good employee:

  • Has common sense
  • Positive attitude
  • Honest
  • Willing to help run the business
  • Takes initiative
  • Trustworthy
  • Has the employer’s interest at hand

Applying for a position in a Florist Shop

You must:

  • Be well groomed
  • Polite
  • Enthusiastic
  • Have references/report cards from previous positions
  • Bring samples/photographs of your own floral designs

Commonly, the florist will ask you to make up an arrangement, posy or sheaf. For that, you must:

  • Choose suitable flowers and foliage
  • Create a design in approximately 15-20 minutes

Don’t worry if you’re feeling nervous.

By nature, florists are understanding individuals. It’s better to be nervous than have an undesirable “know it all” attitude.

A few years ago, a position was open in a florist shop in Perth for a junior and a young woman out of 40 applicants got the job because she was the most capable of creating attractive floral designs in the quickest amount of time. The young woman also was kind and during the interview said, “I am very impressed with your shop and I would love to have the opportunity to work for you”.

An employer would much rather a person who shows that they want the position in preference to someone who is indifferent.

This is something we discuss in our Industry Ready courses.

Owning your own shop

 

The idea of creating your own shop and business can be tempting, however you should be fully aware of all the facts before making it a reality.

How to decide if you are the right type of person to create a floristry business

Advantages

  • You will feel fulfilment in being involved in such a creative industry
  • If you run it successfully, it’s more financially rewarding than working for wages.
  • Feeling secure
  • Never a dull moment
  • Meet new, interesting people through directly dealing with the public and that can lead into lasting friendships
  • Can become a secure life-long career.

Disadvantages (You will find it helpful to do this questionnaire)

Because running a shop is a lot of hard work and involves long hours, do you have the time and energy to run it? Yes No
Do you have enough funds to start it? Yes No
Are you self-motivated and disciplined to organise and prioritise? Yes No
Are you a reasonably quick worker? Yes No
When problems arise, do you quickly come up with solutions? Yes No
If you have family, do you have someone you can rely on to look after the kids? Yes No


To stand a good chance in the floristry business, you should honestly be able to answer “yes” to most of the questions.

When you decide to give it a fair shot, do remember this: How successful you are in Floristry, like anything in life, will depend on how much time and effort you’re prepared to put in.

If you’re passionate about floristry and you want to learn the core skills to be ready to tackle floristry as a career, in a workplace or in your own business we recommend you check out our Industry Ready courses or contact during normal office hours.

5 Things you may not know about being a Florist

Ever wondered what it really takes to become a Florist? I get messages on a daily basis from wonderful blossoms who unfortunately have an incorrect view of what it takes to be successful in the floristry industry.

Here’s my top 5 Things you may not know about being a Florist

1. You need more than 8 weeks to become a competent Florist

It takes more than just a couple of classes to be competent and confident in this field.

Lots of times I hear questions like” So, after I have completed this 8 week course, will I be able to have my own floristry business? “

Sorry blossoms, the short answer to this is: ‘No’

The longer answer is : Please acknowledge that Floristry is a profession and should be treated as such!

Professionalism comes from knowing not just one or a few different facets of the field, but ideally all of them!

One can’t call themselves a florist, just like that. Just like you would call anyone a doctor after a few weeks.

There is time involved, dedication and hard work to get there. And don’t forget passion!

Learning a new profession takes time, just like learning any new skill.

Floristry is no different and everyone who has started thinking there can’t be that much to it putting a few flowers together will be or has been proven wrong soon after they started their training.

2. There is a lifetime of learning in Floristry

table flower

 

There is so much to learn in our wonderful profession, that it takes a good year of part-time studies to maybe getting closer to the goal of being your own boss…

Possibly longer.

In Germany where I did my traineeship, traineeships are 3 full years long for this profession. When you consider that, it then seems crazy to think, we would know it all after a few months!! Right?

If you are a beginner the best starting point at FDS is the Floristry Foundations course which will introduce you to the fundamentals in theory as well as the practical application. This course also is delivered as an intensive.

3. Master the basics of Floristry first

You have to get the basics right first, it is like the foundation of the house: If it isn’t right, everything that comes after it, won’t work that well.

Thats why we go in-depth in our Floristry Foundations course.

The smallest move that is taught the correct way can assist you to be time-efficient in your job or business and will help you take care of your body in the long run!

We can’t take short-cuts when it comes to learning a new skill.

You wouldn’t demand a short cut on a sprouting flower, so be patient on yourself.

It would be like thinking, that you can be a painting artist, but you don’t even know about the different techniques, brushes, preparation of the canvas, mediums, mixing colour etc.

We can’t just “wing it” and just do random things… we will never have a professional product in the end, and it will not represent the rest of the Industry in the right way!

4. Learn the fundamentals of design.

A skFlorist bouquetilled practitioner with excellent design, in any profession shines through.

The more skilful you are the easier you will make it seem for others but the beauty of your work will be enough to captivate your customers.

But to get there, it takes time, work experience, good tuition, guidance, patience and determination, but also Passion!

5. Floristry is a business.

Being in the Floristry Industry, doesn’t only require you to be a good florist in the practical sense, but also a huge part of it is the business component.

The Marketing strategies, the financials, the stock control, the Human Resources, Staff Management, Payrolls, Tax, Bookkeeping etc.

It’s the whole package, that makes you a true floristry professional.

If you’ve already got some experience in Floristry or would like to become a professional then you will want to check out our 24 week Industry Ready course.

Floristry2

In Summary my blossoms

It takes more than 8 weeks to become a true professional.

In fact there is a lifetime of wonderful learning to be had. You need to first master the basics of design and the fundamentals of floristry.

And realise that this is a business and you need to master this as well to truly flourish as a florist!